Employment Law Training: September 9th, 2019

On September 9, 2019, Hensel Barristers will be offering a training and information day for First Nations’ leaders, administrators, and other staff, in the area of employment law. We will be covering topics such as jurisdiction (Federal, provincial, and inherent), avoiding and responding to claims for wrongful dismissal, workplace investigations, and best practices for employers operating in an Indigenous community or context. More information and registration material to follow, but save the date if this training would benefit your community or organization. We’d love to see you there!

#canadianlaw #indigenous #aboriginal #henselbarristers#canadianlawfirm #aboriginallaw #firstnations #indigenouslawfirm#canada #employmentlaw

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Katherine Hensel will be appearing before the Senate on Bill C-75 and Bill C-92

On May 9, 2019, principal lawyer Katherine Hensel will be appearing before Senate committees to make submissions regarding two different bills.

Katherine will appear on behalf of the Indigenous Bar Association before the Senate Legal Affairs Committee on Bill C-75: An Act to amend the Criminal Code, the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other Acts and to make consequential amendments to other Acts. The focus of Katherine’s submissions are on the disproportionate effects of the proposed amendments to the Criminal Code on Indigenous people accused of serious criminal offences.

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Could tiny homes solve indigenous peoples' housing crisis in Canada?

“There's child welfare, there's health, there's education, there's water, there's infrastructure, housing. Every single element of government services that Canadians take for granted, First Nations people do not. These are, for the most part across the country, treaty people who gave up a tremendous amount based on assurances that they would have access to what the rest of Canada had access to, and they simply haven't.”

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Ruth Ambros
Up For Debate gives voice to neglected women’s issues

“We need a broader public debate to really find out what is happening and why (with missing and murdered aboriginal women),” said aboriginal lawyer Katherine Hensel, one of the panellists. “I think the Canadian public has made it clear that it’s important enough to spend the resources (on a national inquiry).”

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Ruth Ambros
Early intervention could prevent CFS apprehensions, Winnipeg mom says

"The system, as it's currently set up, has no problem spending money — thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars — on keeping children in foster care," Hensel said.

"But often [it] won't spend a dime on supporting children and families within their home and keeping the family together. It should be an extraordinary thing that the child is removed from their home and unfortunately it's a daily occurrence for aboriginal families."

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Ruth Ambros
Focus: First Nations take feds to court over third-party managers

“The Algonquins of Barriere Lake First Nation filed the action in the Ontario Superior Court earlier this year against the federal government, Atmacinta Hartel Financial Management Corp., and BDO Canada LLP. The case is reportedly the first instance of an action against the federal government for alleged breach of fiduciary duty and negligent misrepresentation under its third-party management powers.”

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Ruth Ambros
Aboriginal Woman’s Preserved Pelvis Shown in Court, an Indignity That ‘Can Never Be Undone’

"Indigenous women in general are over sexualized in Canadian society and there are a whole host of misconceptions and stereotypes at play that does actually change people's thoughts on whether or not she may or may not have consented," said Big Canoe.

Hensel agrees. To her, the verdict was not surprising.

"It's entirely consistent with how society treats indigenous women, especially indigenous sex workers," she said. "The criminal justice system is no more equipped than society, currently, to protect indigenous women."

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Ruth Ambros